Daniel T. Stein, MD Curriculum Vitae

  • Name:
  • Daniel T. Stein, M.D.
  • Office Address:
  • 11160 Warner Avenue, Suite 311
    Fountain Valley, California 92708
    (714) 850-7300
  • Date of Birth:
  • December 15, 1955
  • Dependents:
  • Wife Jeule, son Jared, daughter Lili
  • Licenses:
  • Physician and Surgeon, State of California
  • Board Certification:
  • American Board of Orthopaedic Surgeons, 7/90, 12/00, 1/10
  • Undergraduate Education:
  • University of California Irvine, Irvine, CA
    Biological Sciences Major
    September 1973 to June 1975

    California State University, Northridge
    Northridge, California
    B.S. Degree, Biology Major September 1975 to May 1977

  • Graduate Education:
  • University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA
    Masters of Business Administration, September 1977
    Not Completed

    Management Development Program in Health Care,
    Graduate School of Management, UC Irvine, Spring 1995

  • Medical Education:
  • Hahnemann University, School of Medicine
    Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
    August 1979 to June 1983
  • Internship:
  • Hahnemann University Hospital,
    Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
    July 1983 to June 1984 - General Surgery
  • Residency:
  • Harbor/UCLA Medical Center
    Torrance, California
    Orthopaedic Surgery
    July 1984 to June 1988
  • Present Hospital Affiliations:
  • Fountain Valley Regional Hospital
    Fountain Valley, California
    Orange Coast Memorial Medical Center
    Fountain Valley, California
  • Honors and Awards:
  • California State University, Northridge
    * Dean's List, Cum Laude Graduation

    Hahnemann University, School of Medicine
    * Commendations in Biochemistry and Neuroscience
    * Honors in Ob-Gyn
    * Senior Year Honors Program
    * Likoff Cardiovascular Institute Award

    Harbor/UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, California
    * Best Residents Paper at Dana Street Alumni Meeting, 1986

    American Medical Association
    * Physician's Recognition Award, 1992-1995, 2000

    Monarch Healthcare
    * Physician of the Quarter, October, 2003

    OCMA/Orange Coast Magazine
    *Physician of Excellence, 2006, 2009, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2015, 2016, 2017

  • Organizations:
  • Fellow American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons
    Member Orange County Medical Association
    Member California Medical Association
    Member Western Orthopaedic Association
    Member California Orthopaedic Association
    Member Arthroscopy Association of North America

  • Teaching Appointments:
  • 2nd Year Medical Student Clinical Experience College of Medicine University of California, Irvine

    Senior Medical Student Clinical Rotation Graduate University of Medical Sciences Western University

  • Community Activities:
  • Partner Center Donor,
    Orange County Performing Arts Center 2000-present
    Member, Board of Directors, Philharmonic Society of Orange County, 2005- present
    Chairman, Technology Task Force, Philharmonic Society of Orange County, 2008- 2015

  • Volunteering:
  • Attending, Mexicali Orthopaedic Clinic, 1989- present
    Donor Orthopaedic Research and Education Foundation
    Tohoku Earthquake Disaster, Japan, 2nd Harvest Japan, Medication Distribution, Tokyo, Japan, April, 2011
    Specialist Volunteer, UCI Outreach Clinic, 2011- present

  • Committees:
  • Member Medical Executive Committee of Fountain Valley Outpatient Surgery Center

    10-92- 11/02

    Member Medical Advisory Committee of Fountain Valley Outpatient Surgery Center 10-92- 11/02

    Chairman Medical Advisory Committee of Fountain Valley Outpatient Surgery Center

    10-99- 11/02

    Chairman Outpatient Surgery Center Committee, Department of Surgery

    Fountain Valley Regional Hospital 6/03-12 Member Board of Directors

    Personal Care Medical Group 10/92-10/94 Member Utilization Management Committee

    Personal Care Medical Group 10/92-1/00 Member Utilization Management Committee

    Affiliated Doctors of Orange County 1/01-2011 Member Quality Assurance Committee

    Personal Care Medical Group 10/92-1/99

    Chairman Quality Management Committee Personal Care Medical Group 1/98-1/99

    Member Rehab Services/Behavioral Physiology Comm. Hoag Hospital 10/93-10/95

    Member Transfusion Committee

    Hoag Hospital  10/93- 10/95

    College Hospital Physician Advisor

    Quality Management for Utilization Review 10/94-12/95

    Member Utilization Review Committee

    Edinger Medical Group 1/95- 2011 Member Quality Assurance Committee

    Edinger Medical Group 1/95- 2011 Member Utilization Review Committee

    Fountain Valley Regional Hospital  1/96- 2002

    Member Surgical Quality Review Committee

    Fountain Valley Regional Hospital 1/98- present Member Medical Leadership Council

    Monarch Healthcare 1/04- 12/05 Expert Medical Reviewer

    Medical Board of California 5/20/96- present Member Orthopaedic Task Force

    Fountain Valley Regional Hospital 1/01- present AAOS Orthopaedic Expert Witness 11/04- present Chairman, Board of Managers, Specialty Surgery Center at

    FVRH, 9/07- 12.

    Member Board of Governors

    Fountain Valley Regional Hospital 1/09- 2015 Secretary, Board of Governors

    Fountain Valley Regional Hospital  6/09- 1/12

    Member OR Committee

    Fountain Valley Regional Hospital  1/10- present

Papers, Chapters and Abstracts:

  1. The use of electric current and electromagnetic fields in the treatment of bone fractures and non-unions.

    D.T. Stein.

    Unpublished, April 1982

  2. The pharmacodynamic responses to clonidine during dynamic and static physical

    D.T. Lowenthal, S.D. Saris, D. Dickerman, D.T. Stein,

    P.J. Lowenthal, and B. Faulkner.

    International Symposium on Hypertension, Tel Aviv, Israel, November 1982.

  3. The influence of calcium channel antagonists on serum potassium in response to isometric

    D.T. Stein, D.T. Lowenthal, S.D. Saris, and B. Faulkner. Clinical Research 31(2):253A, 1983

  4. Modification of hemodynamic responses to isometric activity by calcium channel

    D.T. Stein, D.T. Lowenthal, S.D. Saris, and B. Faulkner. Clinical Research 31(2):254A, 1983

  5. Drug effects - Exercise testing and training (chapter). T. Lowenthal and D.T. Stein

    Rehabilitation of the Cardiac Patient, 2nd edition, Houghton Mifflin Publishers, 1986

  6. Do antihypertensives blunt the diastolic pressor response to static exercise?

    D.T. Lowenthal, D. Dickerman, S.D. Saris, E.L. Bravo, D.T. Stein, and B. Faulkner. American Heart Association, 56th Scientific Sections

  7. The effects of calcium channel antagonists on the diastolic pressor response to static

    D.T. Stein, D.T. Lowenthal, E.L. Bravo, S.D. Saris, and

    Faulkner.

    American Heart Association, 56th Scientific Sections

  8. The clinical pharmacology of cardiovascular drugs during

    D.T. Lowenthal, D.T. Stein, T. Hare, A. Yarnoff.

    Journal of Cardiac Rehabilitation, 3(12), December 20, 1983

  9. Do antihypertensives and calcium channel blockers blunt the catecholamine responses to static exercise?

    S.D. Saris, M.D., D.T. Lowenthal, B. Faulkner, M.D.,

    Bravo, M.D., and D.T. Stein.

    Submitted to the American Society of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  10. Modification of hemodynamic response to isometric activity by central alpha

    D.T. Stein, M.D., D. Dickerman, M.D., D.T. Lowenthal, et al. Submitted to Hypertension

  11. Effects of Nifedipine and Verapamil on isometric and dynamic exercise in normal

    D.T. Stein, M.D., D.T. Lowenthal, M.D., S. Porter, Pharm D., B. Faulkner, M.D., et al.

    American Journal of Cardiology, 54, August 1, 1984

  12. The Hansen-Street nail in femoral shaft fractures - A retrospective study of 211

    D.T. Stein, M.D. and F. Proano, M.D.

    Daniel T. Stein, M.D.

  13. Intramedullary nailing of femoral shaft fractures using the Hansen-Street

    Stein, M.D., F. Proano, M.D., P. Johanson, M.D.,

    Stryker, M.D. and W. Kim, M.D.

    Intramedullary Rods: Clinical performance and related laboratory testing, ASTM, 1989.

  14. Comparing the Long and Short Heads of Biceps Femoris in Patients with Cerebral

    Jacqueline Perry, M.D., Daniel Stein, M.D. and Mark Hoffer, M.D.  1986, Unpublished

  15. Dorsal and Radial Perilunate Dislocation with a Volar Lunate Dislocation/A Case

    Daniel Stein, M.D. 1987, Unpublished

  16. Triple Arthrodesis with Charcot-Marie - Tooth Daniel Stein, M.D. and William Stryker, M.D.

    1987, Unpublished

  17. Profix Total Knee System, International Protocol, North America 1998 Multicenter Study, Ongoing
  18. The Effectiveness of the Use of Electrocautery with Chondroplasty in the Treatment of Chondromalacic

    Daniel Stein, MD, Cosimo Ricciardi, DPM, Thomas Viehe, MD Arthroscopy: The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Research, 18(2), February, 2002

  19. What's New in Sports Medicine, The Effectiveness of the Use of Electrocautery with Chondroplasty in the Treatment of Chondromalacic Lesions.

    Daniel Stein, MD, Cosimo Ricciardi, DPM, Thomas Viehe, MD

    JBJS, 86A (3), March 2004

  20. The Dilemma of the Wedding Band

    Daniel T Stein, MD Alanna Pankovich, DPM Orthopedics, February, 2009

Presentations:

  1. "The Effects of Calcium Channel Antagonists on Isometric and Isotonic Exercise."
    D.T. Stein
    Honors Research Sub-Committee, Hahnemann University, Philadelphia, PA, April, 1983
  2. "Interferon in Urology," Hahnemann University Department of Urologic Surgery, Grand Rounds, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, November 1983
  3. "The Hansen-Street Nail in Femoral Shaft Fractures - A Retrospective Study of 211 Cases,"
    D.T. Stein, M.D. and F. Proano, M.D.
    AOA Residents Conference, Santa Monica, CA, May, 1986
  4. "The Hansen-Street Nail in Femoral Shaft Fractures,"
    D. Stein, M.D. and F. Proano, M.D.
    Dana Street Alumni Meeting, Harbor/UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA, June, 1986
  5. "The Hansen-Street Nail in Femoral Shaft Fractures,"
    D. Stein, M.D., F. Proano, M.D., P. Johanson, M.D.,
    W. Stryker, M.D. and W. Kim, M.D.
    American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, San Francisco, CA, January, 1987
  6. "The Hansen-Street Nail in Femoral Shaft Fractures,"
    D. Stein, M.D., F. Proano, M.D., P. Johanson, M.D.,
    W. Stryker, M.D., and W. Kim, M.D.
    At symposium on Femoral Intramedullary Rod's Clinical Performance and Related Laboratory Testing, ASTM, Cincinnati, OH, May, 1987
  7. "The Hansen-Street Nail in Femoral Shaft Fractures,"
    D. Stein, M.D., F. Proano, M.D., P. Johanson, M.D.,
    W. Stryker, M.D., and W. Kim, M.D. UCLA Grand Rounds, March 14, 1987
  8. "The Hansen-Street Nail in Femoral Shaft Fractures,"
    D. Stein, M.D., F. Proano, M.D., P. Johanson, M.D.,
    W. Stryker, M.D., and W. Kim, M.D.
    American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, January 1988, Atlanta, Georgia
  9. "Shoulder Arthroscopy"
    Grand Rounds Harbor UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, California March, 1988
  10. 10. "The Hansen-Street Nail in Femoral Shaft Fractures,"
    D. Stein, M.D., F. Proano, M.D., P. Johanson, M.D.,
    W. Stryker, M.D., and W. Kim, M.D.
    North American Trauma Fellows Conference Harbor/UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, California, October, 1988
  11. "Orthopaedic Traumatic Injuries"
    Fountain Valley Regional Trauma Conference, Fountain Valley, California,
    May, 1989.
  12. "Treatment of Non Displaced Fractures and Cast Application" Edinger Medical Group, Fountain Valley, California October, 1995
  13. "Major Joints"
    Senior VIP Club, Fountain Valley Regional Hospital Fountain Valley, California,
    July, 2001
  14. "The Effectiveness of the Use of Electrocautery with Chondroplasty in the Treatment of Chondromalacic Lesions." Arthroscopy Association of North America, Annual Meeting, Washington, DC, April, 2002,

Continuing Medical Education:

  1. July 24, 1988, NASS Annual Meeting, American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, Colorado Springs, Colorado, 13 hours.
  2. February 9, 1989, American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons 56th Annual Meeting, Las Vegas, Nevada, 32.5 hours.
  3. April 2, 1989, American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, Comprehensive Review Course for Orthopaedic Surgeons, Chicago, Illinois, 54 hours.
  4. July 14, 1989, American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery, American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery Exam Part I, Chicago, Illinois, 100 hours.
  5. October 28, 1989, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Comprehensive Review & Update of Foot Surgery, Los Angeles, California, 5.5 hours.
  6. May 18, 1990, University of Texas, Southwestern Orthopaedic Surgery Review, Dallas, Texas, 25 hours.
  7. July 13, 1990, American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery, American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery Exam Part II, Chicago, Illinois, 25 hours.
  8. February 21-23, 1991, Medical College of Wisconsin, Midwinter Dow Corning Wright Hip and Knee Arthroscopy Course, 7.5 hours.
  9. March 8, 1991, American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons 58th Annual Meeting, Anaheim, California, 32.5 hours.
  10. November 2-9, 1991, University of California Los Angeles, Thirteenth International Seminar on Operative Arthroscopy, Kauai, Hawaii, 30
  11. January 16-18, 1992, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, North American Hip and Knee Symposium, Beaver Creek, Colorado, 4.5 hours.
  12. February 20-25, 1992, American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, 59th Annual Meeting, Washington, C., 30.5 hours.
  13. May 7, 1992, University of California San Francisco, Loss Prevention Program, San Francisco, California, 3 hours.
  14. November 10, 1992, Fountain Valley Regional Hospital, HIV and the Healthcare Worker, Fountain Valley, California, 1 hour.
  15. December 6, 1992, Hahnemann University, The Power of Invention: New Ideas for Better Patient Care, Anaheim, California, 2 hours.
  16. February 18-23, 1993, American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, 60th Annual Meeting, San Francisco, 38.5 hours.
  17. July 26, 1993, Kaiser Permanente "An Update In Orthopaedics 1993." Maui, Hawaii, 20 hours.
  18. January 19-22, 1994, International Conference Services, Wright Medical Technology symposium on Advances in Total Joint Arthroplasty, Park City, Utah, 10.5 hours.
  19. February 1994, AAOS Meeting The Challenge for Managed Care. San Francisco,
  20. February 4 and 5, 1994. Blue Shield Partnership Symposium on Managed Care, Indian Wells,California.
  21. February 26, 1994, American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, New Orleans, Louisiana, 37.5 hours.
  22. June 1994, College of Osteopathic Medicine of the Pacific, Medical Student Preceptor, Orthopaedic Surgery, Fountain Valley, California, 160 hours
  23. February-June 1995, University of California, Irvine, Graduate School of Management, Management Development Program in Health Care, 76 hours
  24. January 18-20, 1996, North American Hip and Knee Symposium, University of Alabama, Beaver Creek, Colorado, 17 hours
  25. June 1995, College of Osteopathic Medicine of the Pacific, Medical Student Preceptor, Orthopaedic Surgery, Fountain Valley, California, 160 hours
  26. March 1996, American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, Atlanta, Georgia 28.5 hours.
  27. June, 1997, Western University of Health Sciences, Medical Student Preceptor 640 hours
  28. January, 1998, Western University of Health Sciences, Medical Student Preceptor 640 hours
  29. March, 1998, American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, New Orleans, Louisiana, 26.5 hours
  30. June, 1998, Western University of Health Sciences, Medical Student Preceptor 800 hours
  31. December, 1998, Mergers and Orthopaedic Alliances, AAOS, Phoenix, Arizona, 8 hours
  32. February, 1999, American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, Anaheim, California, 28.5 hours
  33. May, 1999, Southwestern Orthopaedic Surgery Review, Dallas, Texas, 26 hours
  34. August, 1999, Western University of Health Sciences, Medical Student Preceptor 160 hours
  35. July, 2000, American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery, American Board of Orthopaedic Recertification Exam Irvine, CA 100 hours
  36. February, 2000, American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, Orlando, Florida, 28.5 hours
  37. August, 2000, Western University of Health Sciences, Medical Student Preceptor 160 hours
  38. September, 2000, Performance and Practice of Successful Orthopaedic Groups, Costa Mesa, CA, 16 hours
  39. February, 2001, American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, San Francisco, CA, 28.5 hours
  40. April, 2002, Arthroscopy Association of North America, Annual Meeting, Washington, DC, 13.75 hours
  41. February, 2003, American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, New Orleans, LA, 28 hours.
  42. October, 2003, Western University of Health Sciences, Medical Student Preceptor 160 hours
  43. January, 2005, Western University of Health Sciences, Medical Student Preceptor 160 hours
  44. February, 2005, American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, Washington, DC, 28 hours.
  45. May, 2005, Western University of Health Sciences, Medical Student Preceptor 320 hours.
  46. October, 2005, Western University of Health Sciences, Medical Student Preceptor 160 hours.
  47. February, 2006, Western University of Health Sciences, Medical Student Preceptor 320 hours.
  48. April, 2006, Western University of Health Sciences, Medical Student Preceptor 160 hours.
  49. August, 2006, Scan Health Plan, Enhancing the Effectiveness of the Doctor-Patient relationship 3.75 hours.
  50. June, 2006, UCSD, School of Medicine, Pain Management Homestudy 12 hours.
  51. October, 2006, American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, 2004 Adult Reconstructive Surgery of the Hip and Knee OSAE 10 hours.
  52. October, 2006, American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, 2004 Sports Medicine OSAE 10 hours.
  53. October, 2006, American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, 2004 Pediatric Orthopaedic OSAE 10 hours.
  54. October, 2006, American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, 2005 Anatomy-Imaging OSAE 10 hours.
  55. November, 2006, American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, 2005 Musculoskeletal Tumors and Diseases OSAE 10 hours.
  56. November, 2006, American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, 2005 Upper Extremity OSAE 10 hours.
  57. November, 2006, American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, Venous Thromboembolism & Patient Safety .25 hours.
  58. November, 2006, American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, Online 2005 Orthopaedic Self-Assessment Examination 50 hours.
  59. December, 2006, American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, SRO 01 Knee Arthroplasty 6 hours.
  60. February, 2007, American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, Annual Meeting, San Diego, CA, 31 hours.
  61. November, 2007, Arthroscopy Association of North America, Fall Course, Orlando, FL, 13 hours.
  62. November, 2007, American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, Board Maintenance of Certification Prep and Review Course, with Completion of Pre and Post Course Sample Test Questions, San Diego, CA, 27 hours.
  63. April 2008, American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery, Maintainence of Certification Examination, Lake Forest, CA 25 hours
  64. February, 2009, American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, Annual Meeting, Las Vegas, 27 hours.
  65. May, 2009, Tenet Corporate Integrity Agreement: Physician Leadership Refresher Training-Year 3, Online, 2 hours.
  66. April - June, 2009, Western University of Health Sciences, Medical Student Preceptor 120 hours.
  67. July, 2009, Clinician-Patient Communication to Enhance Health Outcomes, IHC, Fountain Valley, CA, 4 hours.
  68. October, 2009, Management of the Difficult Patient, IHC, Fountain Valley, CA, 4 hours.
  69. February 2010, EPIC Basics for Infrequent Physician Users, Fountain Valley, CA, 4< hours./li>
  70. February 2010, Adult Reconstructive Surgery of the Hip and Knee, AAOS online, 10 hours.
  71. February, 2011, American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, Annual Meeting, San Diego, CA, 20 hours.
  72. April 2011, Radiation Injuries and Their Management, Fountain Valley, CA, 1 hours.
  73. December 2011, Pediatric Orthopaedics, AAOS online, 10 hours.
  74. March 2012, EPIC Upgrade WBT - Physicians, Long Beach Memorial Medical Center, 2 hours.
  75. October, 2012, AANA Masters Shoulder Course, Chicago, IL, 18.5 hours.
  76. November 2012, Sports Medicine, AAOS online, 10 hours.
  77. December 2012, Adhesive Capsulitis, AAOS online, 1.5 hours.
  78. December 2012, Anatomy Imaging, AAOS online, 10 hours.
  79. March, 2013, American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, Annual Meeting, Chicago, IL, 29.5 hours.
  80. April 2013, Musculoskeletal Tumors, AAOS online, 10 hours.
  81. October - December, 2012, Western University of Health Sciences, Medical Student Preceptor 120 hours.
  82. October 2013, Upper Extremity, AAOS online, 15 hours
  83. October 2013, Karen Zupko- Mastering Orthopaedic Coding, Las Vegas, NV, 7 hours.
  84. March 2014, American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, Annual Meeting, New Orleans, LA, 25 hours.
  85. January- June, 2014, Western University of Health Sciences, Medical Student Preceptor 104 hours.
  86. March 2015, American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, Annual Meeting, Las Vegas, NV, 16.5 hours.
  87. March 2015, AANA Specialty Day, Las Vegas, NV, 3.75 hours
  88. April 2015, AANA Annual Meeting, Los Angeles, CA, 18.5 hours
  89. December 2015, Adult Reconstructive Surgery of the Hip and Knee, AAOS online, 10 hours.
  90. September-April, 2015, Western University of Health Sciences, Medical Student Preceptor 148 hours.
  91. March 2016, American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, Annual Meeting, Orlando, FL, 18 hours.
  92. March 2016, AANA Specialty Day, Orlando, FL, 7.75 hours.
  93. May 2016, Spine, AAOS online, 10 hours.
  94. May 2016, Classification of Distal Radius Fractures, AAOS online, 1 hours.

US Patents:

  1. Surgical Glove, #5,345,612, September 13, 1994

    Abstract: An improved surgical glove is provided having reinforcing pads over the distal finger and thumb pulps and over the metacarpal-phalangeal joints. The fingertips and thumb tips are the most likely region of a surgical glove to be accidentally penetrated by a needle during a surgical procedure. Furthermore, the finger tips, thumb tips, and metacarpal-phalangeal portion of the surgical glove are the most likely portions of the glove to become abraded and possibly torn during a surgical procedure. Thus, the reinforcing pads are optimally located for minimizing the possibility of a tear or a needle penetration. The remaining portions of the surgical glove are of conventional thickness and flexibility, thereby assuring adequate mobility of the fingers and hand, such that precise surgical procedures may be performed while using the improved glove.

  2. One-Hand Needle Capping System, #5,399,169, March 21, 1995

    Abstract: A "one hand" needle capping system utilizing a bed of nontoxic, non hardening clay for reapplying a protective cap to a needle of a syringe.

  3. Surgical Glove, #5,428,841, July 4, 1995

    Abstract: An improved surgical glove is provided having reinforcing pads over the distal finger and thumb pulps and over the metacarpal-phalangeal j o i n t s . T h e fingertips and thumb tips are the most likely region of a surgical glove to be accidentally penetrated by a needle during a surgical procedure. Furthermore, the finger tips, thumb tips, and metacarpal-phalangeal portion of the surgical glove are the most likely portions of the glove to become abraded and possibly torn during a surgical procedure. Thus, the reinforcing pads are optimally located for minimizing the possibility of a tear or a needle penetration. The remaining portions of the surgical glove are of conventional thickness and flexibility, thereby assuring adequate mobility of the fingers and hand, such that precise surgical procedures may be performed w h i l e using the improved glove.

  4. Surgical Glove Manufacturing, #5,500,957, April, 1996

    Abstract: An improved surgical glove is provided having reinforcing pads formed over the distal finger and thumb pulps and over the metacarpal-phalangeal joints. The fingertips and thumb tips are the most likely region of a surgical glove to be accidentally penetrated by a needle during a surgical procedure. The remaining portions of the surgical glove are of conventional thickness and flexibility, thereby assuring adequate mobility of the fingers and hand, such that precise surgical procedures may be performed while using the improved glove. A method for forming the glove and a glove mold are also disclosed. The glove is formed by dipping a glove mold in a liquid such as latex. The glove mold has recesses on the volar sides of the Daniel T. Stein, M.D.

    distal ends of the digits to retain a greater thickness of the liquid to form the reinforcing pads

  5. 5. Patello-Femoral Joint Replacement Device and Method, #5,571,196, November 5, 1996

    Abstract: A prosthetic system comprising a patellar unit to replace the femoral surface of the patella with a convex prosthesis constructed from a low-friction material and an elongate femoral prosthesis for replacing the trochlear groove. The femoral prosthesis has a trough-like indentation on its upper surface to accommodate the patella prosthesis and a lower surface with protruding vanes. The lower surface and the vanes are made of a biocompatible material that promotes the bonding to living bone. The femoral prosthesis is inserted by first driving a guide rod into the distal end of the femur. Then a guide frame is inserted onto the rod to guide an instrument in the cutting of a groove in the trochlear portion of the femur. Then a second guide frame replaces the first guide frame acting as a template of cutting slots sized to receive the vanes of the prosthesis. Finally, the guide frame and rod are removed, and the prosthesis is pressed into the cut groove with the vanes occupying the slots. The prosthesis is fixed in place with an insertable peg. Over time the interaction of the bone with the vanes results in tight integration of the prosthesis so that it cannot not be loosened.

  6. Patello-Femoral Joint Replacement Device and Method, #5,824,098, October 20, 1998

    Abstract: A prosthetic system comprising a patellar unit to replace the femoral surface of the patella with a convex prosthesis constructed from a low-friction material and an elongate femoral prosthesis for replacing the trochlear groove. The femoral prosthesis has a trough-like indentation on its upper surface to accommodate the patellar prosthesis and a lower surface with protruding vanes. The lower surface and the vanes are made of a biocompatible material that promotes the bonding to living bone. The femoral prosthesis is inserted by first driving a guide rod into the distal end of the femur. Then a guide frame is inserted onto the rod to guide an instrument in the cutting of a groove in the trochlear portion of the femur. Then a second guide frame replaces the first guide frame acting as a template of cutting slots sized to receive the vanes of the prosthesis. Finally, the guide frame and rod are removed, and the prosthesis is pressed into the cut groove with the vanes occupying the slots. The prosthesis is fixed in place with an insertable peg. Over time the interaction of the bone with the vanes results in tight integration of the prosthesis so that it cannot not be loosened.

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